I just finished reading The Ashford Affair by Lauren Willig.  It was wonderful.  In my opinion, there are two kinds of books, those that you read and those that make time fly.  The Ashford Affair was a  Time Flies book.  I couldn’t put it down, I was that compelled to find out what happened to Addie, Bea and Clemmie.  And when the book was over?  I had tears in my eyes, as much because I had to say goodbye to these characters as I did the happy ending.

strive to write booksYet again, I find myself realizing that the writing is what matters.   Last week, at the RWA National Conference in San Antonio, I was surrounded by Outliers.  Nora Roberts, Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Eloisa James, Kristan Higgins, Hugh Howey, Bella Andre, Marie Force – authors who have achieved levels of success I may never achieve.  I realized that I will probably never work the 80-100 hours a week it takes to reach Outlier status, nor will I, in my present publishing circumstances, hit the New York Times Bestsellers List.

I can however, write a Time Flies book.   So maybe it won’t be read by millions of people.  For the few thousand who do pick up my book, I want to transport them out of their heads and into the world I created.  If I do, then my book is a success.

I’m not alone in this thinking, by the way.   Speaker after speaker reiterated the same advice: the best way to build a career is to write a good book, followed by another good book, and another.  But then, didn’t we all already know this?  Don’t we have an obligation to the readers to give them good read after good read.

Even so, it’s important advice to remember.  And when pick up an awesome read, like The Ashford Affair, you realize why.

So, what’s the last Time Flies book you read?

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